RAID 5 versus RAID 10 RAID Recovery

RAID 5 versus RAID 10 RAID Recovery

RAID 5 versus RAID 10 RAID Recovery

Known as Redundant Array of Independent Drives (RAID), this is a data storage system stores and replicates information for additional redundancy and protection across several hard drives for RAID recovery. You can use RAID to increase either the I/O performance or data reliability, but they work against each other if you try both. In choosing from the different types of RAID systems on the market, you will need to know which is best for your needs that fits into your budget.
What is RAID 10?
This system combines both RAID 0 and RAID 1 which excels at fault tolerance.RAID recovery is not easy and costly. By striping the data across multiple disks, the performance is increased and there is the mirroring of disks which provides for duplication of your data. What’s interesting about the RAID 10 is that in some versions it does write and read data faster than the RAID 5.
Requirements for RAID 10 & RAID 5
There is little doubt about the similarities between the RAID 10 and RAID 5, which has lead to some confusion about which one may be best for your needs. Here are the requirements for both.
To operate the RAID 10, it offers the following;
4000 GB Drive Size
8 TB Capacity
4 Disks + Spare Drive
Efficiency of Storage: 50%
Read Performance: 4x
Write Performance: 2x
Fault Tolerance: Single Disk
For the RAID 5, it offers the following;
4000 GB Drive Size
8 TB capacity
3 Disks + Spare Drive
Efficiency of Storage: 66.7%
Read Performance: 2x
Write Performance: 1x
Fault Tolerance: Single Disk
As you can see, the RAID 5 does have a greater efficiency when it comes to storage, but the RAID 10 offers superior read and write performance which many value. However, what many people notice immediately is that the RAID 5 uses one fewer disk which can save considerably on the initial cost.
Is the RAID 5 Worth the Cost? For RAID recovery.
While the RAID 5 does offer substantial performance, in comparison to the RAID 10 there are some issues that have surfaced.
Most notably, the RAID 5 is costlier compared to the RAID 10 for write-intensive applications. It’s also not as outage resilient, does not possess the flexibility architecturally to adapt to different systems, and can suffer from significant performance issues during times of a partial outage. Add to that the RAID 5 having performance problems will mean spending a significant amount for repairs.
The bottom line is that the RAID 10 outperforms the RAID 5 in terms of both read speed and write speed while operating under the same fault tolerance and array capacity. Furthermore, the RAID 10 cost a fraction compared to the RAID 5 when you consider the cost in terms of overtime, DBAs, managers, wear and tear, and customers if there is a recovery issue. The cost in the loss of business is arguably the most notable concern which means for most, if not all applications, the RAID 10 is the one to choose.

Data Recovery 47 NYC